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Workshop Manual Drive 2(0) c Aquamatic 200 Workshop Manual Aquamatic 200 B, C Index Safety Precautions ........................................................................................ 2 General information ....................................................................................... 5 Repair instructions ......................................................................................... 6 Part I Description ................................................................................ 8 Part II Removing the outboard drive unit Part III Reconditioning the upper gear housing.................................. 10 A. Removing ................................................................................... 10 B. Adjusting the upper gear ............................................................. 11 C. Fitting ......................................................................................... 13 D. Reconditioning the control mechanism ........................................ 14 Part IV Reconditioning the intermediate housing A. Removing ................................................................................... 15 B. Fitting ......................................................................................... 15 Part V Reconditioning the lower gear A. Removing ................................................................................... 16 B. Fitting ......................................................................................... 17 C. Adjusting the lower gear.............................................................. 17 D. Fitting the axial bearing ............................................................... 18 Part VI Fitting the outboard drive unit ................................................. 19 Part VII Fitting the outboard drive on the transom .............................. 19 Part VIII Reconditioning the lift .............................................................. 21 Part IX Specifications ........................................................................... 23 Change from L.H. to R.H. propeller rotation ................................. 23 Part X Special tools ............................................................................. 24 Part XI Assembly drawings .................................................................. 25 Safety Precautions Introduction This Workshop Manual contains technical data, descriptions and repair instructions for Volvo Penta products or product versions contained in the contents list. Ensure that the correct workshop literature is being used. Read the safety information and the Workshop Manual “General Information” and “Repair Instructions” carefully before starting work. Important In this book and on the engine you will find the following special warning symbols. WARNING! If these instructions are not followed there is a danger of personal injury, extensive damage to the product or serious mechanical malfunction. IMPORTANT! Used to draw your attention to something that can cause damage, product malfunction or damage to property. NOTE! Used to draw your attention to important information that will facilitate work or operations. Below is a summary of the risks and safety precautions you should always observe or carry out when operating or servicing the engine. Immobilize the engine by turning off the power supply to the engine at the main switch (switches) and lock it (them) in the OFF position before starting work. Set up a warning notice at the engine control point or helm. Generally, all servicing should be carried out with the engine switched off. Some work (carrying out certain adjustments for example) requires the engine to be running. Approaching a running engine is dangerous. Loose clothing or long hair can fasten in rotating parts and cause serious personal injury. If working in proximity to a running engine, careless movements or a dropped tool can result in personal injury. Avoid burns. Take precautions to avoid hot surfaces (exhausts, turbochargers, charge air pipes and starter elements etc.) and liquids in supply lines and hoses when the engine is running or has been turned off immediately prior to starting work on it. Reinstall all protective parts removed during service operations before starting the engine. Check that the warning or information decals on the product are always clearly visible. Replace decals that have been damaged or painted over. Engine with turbocharger: Never start the engine without installing the air cleaner (ACL). The rotating compressor in the Turbo can cause serious personal injury. Foreign objects entering the intake ducts can also cause mechanical damage. Never use start spray or similar to start the engine. The starter element may cause an explosion in the inlet manifold. Danger of personal injury. Avoid opening the filler cap for engine coolant system (freshwater cooled engines) when the engine is still hot. Steam or hot coolant can spray out. Open the coolant filler cap carefully and slowly to release pressure before removing the cap completely. Take great care if a cock, plug or engine coolant line must be removed from a hot engine. It is difficult to anticipate in which direction steam or hot coolant can spray out. Hot oil can cause burns. Avoid skin contact with hot oil. Ensure that the lubrication system is not under pressure before commencing work on it. Never start or operate the engine with the oil filler cap removed, otherwise oil could be ejected. Stop the engine and close the sea cock before carrying out operations on the engine cooling system. Only start the engine in a well-ventilated area. If operating the engine in an enclosed space, ensure that exhaust gases and crankcase ventilation emissions are ventilated out of the working area. Always use protective goggles where there is a danger of pieces of metal, sparks from grinding, acid or other chemicals being thrown into your eyes. Your eyes are very sensitive, injury can lead to loss of sight! Avoid skin contact with oil. Long-term or repeated contact with oil can remove the natural oils from your skin. The result can be irritation, dry skin, eczema and other skin problems. Used oil is more dangerous to health than new oil. Use protective gloves and avoid using oil- soaked clothes and rags. Wash regularly, especially before meals. Use the correct barrier cream to prevent dry skin and to make cleaning your skin easier. Most chemicals used in products (engine and transmission oils, glycol, petrol and diesel oil) and workshop chemicals (solvents and paints) are hazardous to health Read the instructions on the product packaging carefully! Always follow safety instructions (using breathing apparatus, protective goggles and gloves for example). Ensure that other personnel are not unwittingly exposed to hazardous substances (by breathing them in for example). Ensure that ventilation is good. Handle used and excess chemicals according to instructions. Be extremely careful when tracing leaks in the fuel system and testing fuel injection nozzles. Use protective goggles! The jet ejected from a fuel injection nozzle is under very high pressure, it can penetrate body tissue and cause serious injury There is a danger of blood poisoning. All fuels and many chemicals are inflammable. Ensure that a naked flame or sparks cannot ignite fuel or chemicals. Combined with air in certain ratios, petrol, some solvents and hydrogen from batteries are easily inflammable and explosive. Smoking is prohibited! Ensure that ventilation is good and that the necessary safety precautions have been taken before carrying out welding or grinding work. Always have a fire extinguisher to hand in the workplace. Store oil and fuel-soaked rags and fuel and oil filters safely. In certain conditions oil-soaked rags can spontaneously ignite. Used fuel and oil filters are environmentally dangerous waste and must be deposited at an approved site for destruction together with used lubricating oil, contaminated fuel, paint remnants, solvent, de- greasing agents and waste from washing parts. Never allow a naked flame or electric sparks near the batteries. Never smoke in proximity to the batteries. The batteries give off hydrogen gas during charging which when mixed with air can form an explosive gas – oxyhydrogen. This gas is easily ignited and highly volatile. Incorrect connection of the battery can cause a spark which is sufficient to cause an explosion with resulting damage. Do not disturb battery connections when starting the engine (spark risk) and do not lean over batteries. Never mix up the positive and negative battery terminals when installing. Incorrect installation can result in serious damage to electrical equipment. Refer to wiring diagrams. Always use protective goggles when charging and handling batteries. The battery electrolyte contains extremely corrosive sulfuric acid. If this comes into contact with the skin, wash immediately with soap and plenty of water. If battery acid comes into contact with the eyes, immediately flush with copious amounts of water and obtain medical assistance. Turn off the engine and turn off power at main switch(es) before carrying out work on the electrical system. Clutch adjustments must be carried out with the engine turned off. Use the lifting eyes mounted on the engine/reverse gear when lifting the drive unit. Always check that lifting equipment is in good condition and has sufficient load capacity to lift the engine (engine weight including reverse gear and any extra equipment installed). To ensure safe handling and to avoid damaging engine components on top of the engine, use a lifting beam to raise the engine. All chains and cables should run parallel to each other and as perpendicular as possible in relation to the top of the engine. If extra equipment is installed on the engine altering its center of gravity, a special lifting device is required to achieve the correct balance for safe handling. Never carry out work on an engine suspended on a hoist. Never remove heavy components alone, even where secure lifting equipment such as secured blocks are being used. Even where lifting equipment is being used it is best to carry out the work with two people; one to operate the lifting equipment and the other to ensure that components are not trapped and damaged when being lifted. When working on-board ensure that there is sufficient space to remove components without danger of injury or damage. Components in the electrical system, ignition system (gasoline engines) and fuel system on Volvo Penta products are designed and constructed to minimize the risk of fire and explosion. The engine must not be run in areas where there are explosive materials. Always use fuels recommended by Volvo Penta. Refer to the Instruction Book. The use of lower quality fuels can damage the engine. On a diesel engine poor quality fuel can cause the control rod to seize and the engine to overrev with the resulting risk of damage to the engine and personal injury. Poor fuel quality can also lead to higher maintenance costs. General information About the workshop manual Replacement parts This workshop manual contains technical specification, descriptions and instructions for repairing Aquamatic outboard drive unit, models B and C. The product designation and number should be given in all correspondence about the product. This Workshop Manual has been developed primarily for Volvo Penta service workshops and qualified personnel. Persons using this book are assumed to have a grounding in marine drive systems and be able to carry out related mechanical and electrical work. Volvo Penta is continuously developing their products. We therefore reserve the right to make changes. All the information contained in this book is based on product data available at the time of going to print. Any essential changes or modifications introduced into production or updated or revised service methods introduced after the date of publication will be provided in the form of Service Bulletins. Replacement parts for electrical and fuel systems are subject to statutory requirements (US Coast Guard Safety Regulations for example). Volvo Penta Genuine parts meet these requirements. Any type of damage which results from the use of non-original Volvo Penta replacement parts for the product will not be covered under any warranty provided by Volvo Penta. Repair instructions The working methods described in the Service Manual apply to work carried out in a workshop.The drive has been removed from the boat and is installed in a fixture. Unless otherwise stated reconditioning work which can be carried out with the drive in place follows the same working method. Warning symbols occurring in the Workshop Manual (for their meaning see Safety information) WARNING! IMPORTANT! NOTE! are not in any way comprehensive since it is impossible to predict every circumstance under which service work or repairs may be carried out. For this reason we can only highlight the risks that can arise when work is carried out incorrectly in a well- equipped workshop using working methods and tools developed by us. All procedures for which there are Volvo Penta special tools in this Workshop Manual are carried out using these. Special tools are developed to rationalize working methods and make procedures as safe as possible. It is therefore the responsibility of any person using tools or working methods other than the ones recommended by us to ensure that there is no danger of injury, damage or malfunction resulting from these. In some cases there may be special safety precautions and instructions for the use of tools and chemicals contained in this Workshop Manual. These special instructions should always be followed if there are no separate instructions in the Workshop Manual. Certain elementary precautions and common sense can prevent most risks arising. A clean workplace and engine eliminates much of the danger of injury and malfunction. It is of the greatest importance that no dirt or foreign particles get into the fuel system, lubrication system, intake system, turbocharger, bearings and seals when they are being worked on. The result can be malfunction or a shorter operational life. Our joint responsibility Each engine consists of many connected systems and components. If a component deviates from its technical specification the environmental impact of an otherwise good engine may be increased significantly. It is therefore vital that wear tolerances are maintained, that systems that can be adjusted are adjusted properly and that Volvo Penta Genuine Parts as used. The engine Maintenance Schedule must be followed. Some systems, such as the components in the fuel system, require special expertise and special testing equipment for service and maintenance. Some components are sealed at the factory for environmental reasons. No work should be carried out on sealed components except by authorized personnel. Bear in mind that most chemicals used on boats are harmful to the environment if used incorrectly. Volvo Penta recommends the use of biodegradable degreasing agents for cleaning engine components, unless otherwise stated in a workshop manual. Take special care when working on-board, that oil and waste is taken for destruction and is not accidentally pumped into the environment with bilge water. Tightening torques Tightening torques for vital joints that must be tightened with a torque wrench are listed in workshop manual “Technical Data”: “Tightening Torques” and are contained in work descriptions in this Manual. All torques apply for cleaned threads, screw heads and mating surfaces. Torques apply for lightly oiled or dry threads. If lubricants, locking fluid or sealing compound are required for a screwed joint this information will be contained in the work description and in “Tightening Torques” Where no tightening torque is stated for a joint use the general tightening torques according to the tables below. The tightening torques stated are a guide and the joint does not have to be tightened using a torque wrench. Dimension Tightening Torques Nm lbt.ft M5 6 4.4 M6 10 7.4 M8 25 18.4 M10 50 36.9 M12 80 59.0 M14 140 103.3 Tightening torques-protractor (angle) tightening Tightening using both a torque setting and a protractor angle requires that first the recommended torque is applied using a torque wrench and then the recommended angle is added according to the protractor scale. Example: a 90° protractor tightening means that the joint is tightened a further 1/4 turn in one operation after the stated tightening torque has been applied. Locknuts Do not re-use lock nuts that have been removed during dismantling as they have reduced service life when re-used – use new nuts when assembling or reinstalling. For lock nuts with a plastic insert such as Nylock® the tightening torque stated in the table is reduced if the Nylock® nut has the same head height as a standard hexagonal nut without plastic insert. Reduce the tightening torque by 25% for bolt size 8 mm or larger. Where Nylock® nuts are higher, or of the same height as a standard hexagonal nut, the tightening torques given in the table apply. Tolerance classes Screws and nuts are divided into different strength classes, the class is indicated by the number on the bolt head. A high number indicates stronger material, for example a bolt marked 10-9 indicates a higher tolerance than one marked 8-8. It is therefore important that bolts removed during the disassembly of a bolted joint must be reinstalled in their original position when assembling the joint. If a bolt must be replaced check in the replacement parts catalogue to make sure the correct bolt is used. Sealants A number of sealants and locking liquids are used on the engines. The agents have varying properties and are used for different types of jointing strengths, operating temperature ranges, resistance to oil and other chemicals and for the different materials and gap sizes in the engines. To ensure service work is correctly carried out it is important that the correct sealant and locking fluid type is used on the joint where the agents are required. In this Volvo Penta Service Manual the user will find that each section where these agents are applied in production states which type was used on the engine. During service operations use the same agent or an alternative from a different manufacturer. Make sure that mating surfaces are dry and free from oil, grease, paint and anti-corrosion agent before applying sealant or locking fluid. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use regarding; temperature range, curing time and any other instructions for the product. Tow different basic types of agent are used on the engine and these are: RTV agent (Room temperature vulcanizing). Use for gaskets, sealing gasket joints or coating gaskets. RTV agent is clearly visible when a component has been dismantled; old RTV must be removed before the joint is resealed. The following RTV agents are mentioned in the Service Manual: Loctite® 574, Volvo Penta 840879-1, Permatex® No. 3, Volvo Penta P/N 1161099-5, Permatex® No. 77. Old sealant can be removed using methylated spirits in all cases. Anaerobic agents. These agents cure in an absence of air. They are used when two solid parts, for example cast components, are installed face-to-face without a gasket. They are also commonly used to secure plugs, threads in stud bolts, cocks, oil pressure switches and so on. The cured material is glass-like and it is therefore colored to make it visible. Cured anaerobic agents are extremely resistant to solvents and the old agent cannot be removed. When reinstalling the part is carefully degreased and then new sealant is applied. The following anaerobic agents are mentioned in the Service Manual: Loctite® 572 (white), Loctite® 241 (blue). NOTE! Loctite® is the registered trademark of Loctite Corporation, Permatex® is the registered trademark of the Permatex Corporation. Part I Description General, Aquamatic 200 The Aquamatic 200 consists of an outboard drive, and of a collar which is attached to the outside of the boat transom and which mounts the drive. The outboard drive and the shield are made of special light-alloy with outstanding anti-corrosion properties. In order to increase still further the protection against corrosion, the surfaces of all the parts exposed to attacks by corrosion have been thoroughly treated. A zinc ring, which eliminates corrosion caused by galvanic currents, is fitted on the lower gear housing behind the propeller. The engine cooling water is sucked in through the cooling water inlets, two gillshaped inlets and a round hole located on the front edge of the lower gear housing. The exhaust gases and cooling water are taken through the exhaust channel of the outboard drive and released under the rear edge of the cavitation plate. On certain types, part of the cooling water flow is released through a separate outlet on the starboard side of the mounting collar. The shift mechanism consists of the Volvo Penta patented cone clutch, of “Silent-Shift” type. The mechanism is fitted with servo disengagement and self-adjusting friction cones and is quiet in engagement and easy to operate. Power transmission Power from the engine is transmitted to the upper gear housing through the vibration damper 37, Fig. 1, the shaft 35 and the double universal joint 4. From the universal joint the power is transmitted to the input gear 7 for forward and reverse, which is in constant mesh with ”forward” and ”reverse” gears 9 and 16. These gears are carried on the countershaft so that they can rotate independently of the shaft. Between the gears 9 and 16 the cone clutch makes it possible to disengage and revers the direction of rotation of the vertical drive shaft 19. The lower end of this shaft drives the propeller shaft 26 through the propeller gearing. The total reduction ratio for the Aquamatic 200 B is 1.59:1 and for the Aquamatic 200 C 1.85:1. Maneuvering The countershaft has a thread between the forward and reverse gears 9 and 16, on this thread the engaging sleeve 13 can be moved up and down by means of the control mechanism 14. Both ends of the engaging sleeve are tapered so that when the sleeve is moved upwards or downwards, the tapered surfaces engage with the corresponding tapers 12 and 15 which are screwed onto the forward and reverse gears. As the engaging sleeve 13 is journalled on the countershaft thread, increased transmission torque from the engine assists in more positive engagement and increased frictional power between the engaging sleeve and the gear tapers. When the control lever is moved to the “Forward” position, the sleeve 13 engages with the taper of the lower gear, whereby the vertical drive shaft 19 is locked in engagement with the gear. The propeller will then rotate for running forward. When the control lever is moved to the “Reverse” position, the sleeve is moved upwards until it engages with the taper 12 on the upper gear, thus producing the opposite direction of rotation. In the neutral position, the engaging sleeve is retained in an intermediate position so that both the gears rotate freely. The gearing described above gives the standard left-hand rotation to the propeller shaft, that is for left-hand rotating propeller. In the case of propeller rotation in the opposite direction (starboard drive in case of double installation), then the upper gear 9 functions as forward gear and the lower gear 16 as reverse. When running in reverse, the outboard drive is kept in its normal position by means of a retaining pawl 30. Steering The outboard drive is steered by the movements of the steering wheel which are transmitted through an internally located steering rod 1 which is fitted on the steering yoke 3. The action of the steering rod is independent of the degree to which the drive is tipped up. The lower parts of the yoke arms are carried in a steering casing 5 which is, in its turn, bolted to the upper gear housing of the outboard drive. The steering angle of the drive is about 30° from the neutral position. Lift device To facilitate tilt of the outboard drive, it is equiped with an electrical-mechanical lift device 2, operated from the helm. The lift device is fitted on the inside of the transom shield and consists of an electric motor and a warm gear operating a push rod on the pivot yoke. The push rod releases the retaining pawl and lifts the drive to its tipped-up position. The electric motor switch off automatically when the drive has attained its fully tilted up or fully lowered positions. When the drive is lowered, it is automatically centred independent of the position of the steering wheel. The maximum tipped-up angle is about 65°. The outboard drive remains in the required tipped-up position and the unit can be run when partly lifted during shorter periods and at low speed. Lubrication The outboard drive oil system is common for both the upper and lower gear housing. The oil is circulated through all the gears and bearings by means of an oil circulation pump 24 fitted to the gear in the lower gear housing. The oil is cooled by the water flowing past the lower part of the outboard drive. The oil dipstick is fitted to the cover above the upper gear housing 8. The oil level is checked with the outboard drive in the driving position. The double universal joint is lubricated for life and requires no periodical servicing. Fig. 1. Cross-section of the Aquamatic 200 . Steering rod . Lift device 14. Control mechanism 15. “Forward” taper 27. Water intake 28. Lower gear housing . Steering yoke . Universal joint . Steering casing . Double bearing box . Input gear . Dipstick · “Reverse” gear . Air -venting screw . Upper gear housing . “Reverse” taper . Engaging sleeve 16. “Forward” gear (standard rotation) 17. Securing block for control cable 18. Control rod 19. Vertical drive shaft 20. Oil filling plug 21. Intermediate housing 22. Exhaust outlet 23. Propeller bearing housing 24. Oil circulation pump 25. Oil drainage plug 26. Propeller shaft 29. Water intake 30. Retaining pawl 31. Push rod 32. Exhaust bellows 33. Cooling water hose 34. Mounting collar 35. Drive shaft 36. Supporting rubber pad 37. Vibration damper 38. Flywheel Part II Removing the outboard drive unit It is of the greatest importance to ensure that the workbench and tools are kept clean when working on the outboard drive unit to prevent impurities from getting into bearings, bushes, etc. Make a habit of always washing the unit externally before disassembling. The figures included in the text below refer to the exploded drawings at the end of this book. 1. Remove the propeller by knocking up the tabs on the lock washer (2, Fig. 2) for the propeller taper (1) and unscrewing the taper. Take off the propeller and the spacing sleeve (184). 2. Slacken the two crosshead screws (181) for the zinc ring and remove the ring (see Fig. 3). 3. Drain the oil from the outboard drive. Remove the dipstick (42) or the air-venting screw (3) as well as the oil drainage plug (187). 4. Remove the control mechanism casing (84) and disconnect the control cable from the yoke (109). Unscrew the securing block (143). Remove the control cable locking plate (138), mounted on the front edge of the intermediate housing. Pull the control cable into the boat so that is goes free from the drive. 5. Loosen the steering casing (44) from the upper gear housing, the universal joint bellows the exhaust bellows from the intermediate housing and the water hose from the cooling-water connection (133) on the yoke. 6. Unscrew the two lock screws (21) which retain the pivot pins (20) in the shield. Place a wood block under the drive, knock out the pivot pins and lift off the drive unit. NOTE: Do not lose the two wear washers (141), located between the yoke and the mounting collar. 7. Loosen the control rod (111) unscrew the screws (95) and loosen the nuts (97) retaining the upper gear housing to the intermediate housing. Strike carefully with a rubber mallet on one of the housings until they can be separated. 8. Count the number of shims between the different housings and on all the gear assemblies in case there is no need to replace the gears, housings, or bearings since, in this case, the same number of shims must be fitted when assembling. 9. Unscrew the seven bolts retaining the lower gear housing to the intermediate housing and strike carefully with a rubber mallet on one of the housings until they separate from each other. Lift off the spline sleeve (193). Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Part III Reconditioning the upper gear housing A. Removing 1. Loosen the control mechanism screws (60) and remove the mechanism. 2. Unscrew the internal hexagon screws for the clamp ring (5) and pull out the universal joint with the double bearing box. 3. Unscrew the four bolts for the gear housing cover (2) and pull off the cover. NOTE: The front right bolt is of the tubular type. 4. Slacken the nut (37) at the top of the countershaft, NOTE: Left-hand thread, and remove the divided circlip (36) with washer (35). Use tool 884264 as a counterhold when slackening the nut. 5. Push out the shaft (30) and the lower gear with bearing sleeve (25). Lift off the engaging sleeve and the spring from the shaft and take off the shaft. 6. Knock out the upper gear with the bearing sleeve. Mark the gears so that they can be rplaced in the same position when assembling. NOTE: Be very careful with the engaging sleeve and the gear tapers to avoid scratches on these parts. 7. Remove the needle bearings and the spacing rings (28 and 29) from the upper and lower gear assemblies. Press the upper and lower gears out of the bearings (11). Use tools 884258 and 884259. 8. Press outthe bearings (11) from the bearing sleeves (25). Use tools 884258 and 884265. 9. Loosen the hexagon screw (24) in the centre of the input gear and pull off the double bearing box (14) from the universal joint. Lift off the clamp ring (5). 10. Remove the washer (17) from the double bearing box and press out the input gear (8) using tools 884258 and 884259. Remove the circlip (27), the seal ring (19), the spacing ring (20) and the inner bearing race. 11. Press out the roller bearing from the gear. Use tool 884165. 12. Clean the parts carefully and check for wear. Replace parts where necessary. NOTE. The gears and tapers are sold in sets to obtain the correct mesh. Since the double bearing box is precision- machined on the basis of the bearing races, the complete bearing box with pressed-in bearing races must be changed when necessary. B. Adjusting the upper gear When assembling the upper gear housing, it is very important that the drive gears and shift gears are in their correct position relative to each other. This applies not only the backlasch between the teeth, but also to the gear teeth contact. Correct gear teeth contact spreads the load over a larger area of the gear tooth. This prevent gear break down and abnormal wear at the same time, provides quit operation. 1. Install the larger roller bearing which is included in the complete double bearing box (14) by pressing it on. Use tool 884263. 2. Install the gear into the double bearing box and press on the smaller roller bearing, so that a certain preload is obtained. Use tools 884263 and 884259. Check the preload by using a spring balance and a cord which is placed round the bearing housing, see Fig. 4. The preload should be 0.1–0.5 kg (1/4–1 lb.) 3. Determine the measurement “B”, see Fig. 5. Use a depth gauge micrometer and measure first from the double bearing box to the inner bearing race and then to the shaft of the input gear. Then calculate the difference. 4. Measure the depth of the recess in the spacer washer (17) and add to this measurement so many shims (22) that the measurement “B” according to point 3 is obtained. 5. Place the spacer washer in position and compress the gear assembly in the double bearing box with tool 884286. Tighten the allen head bolts to a tightening torque of 12.5 kgm (90 lb. ft.). Check the preload which should be between 0.1–0.5 kg (1/4–1 lb.). see Fig. 4. If the preload is too high, the spacer washer should be removed and the gear pressed back somewhat. Place then one more shim under the spacer washer. The double bearing box is then drawn together with tool 884286. Check the preload once more. Fig. 4 Fig. 5 6. Lubricate the ball bearings (11) and press them into their respective bearing boxes (25). NOTE: It is important that the bearings are turned so that the recesses in the bearing races for the fitting of the balls are turned in the direction opposite to the gears. 7. Then press on the bearings (11) and the bearing boxes (25) on the gear (8). NOTE: When compressing, protect the taper so that it is not deformed. 8. Always start adjustment with the “forward” gear. Should the previously removed gears be used, it is important that the “forward” and “reverse” gears are not mixed when fitting. For an outboard drive with standard rotation, i.e. a propeller with a left hand thread, the “forward” gear is the lower gear. An outboard drive with reversed rotation has the upper gear as ”forward” gear. 9. To gain a clearer picture of the contact pattern, coat the teeth on the input gear and meshing gear with a thin coating of marking dye. 10. Fit the “forward” gear in the gear housing (1). Start by inserting 0.2 mm (0.008") shims under the bearing box (25). 11. Fit the attaching plate with part No. 884285 for the upper gear housing in a vice. 12. Fit the upper gear housing on tool 884285 so that the bearing coincides with the corresponding recess in the tool. 13. Fit the input gear with 0.3 mm (0.012") shims under the double bearing box (14). NOTE: The guide pin in the double bearing box should face downwards. 14. Fit the clamp ring together with sufficient shims that the ring actually presses in the double bearing box (there must be clearance between the clamp ring and the gear housing). 15. Rotate the gear in its correct direction of rotation (clockwise) at the same time as the gear is braked hard by pushing against the taper on the gear with a suitable rod, see Fig. 6. The marking dye on the gears is removed on the surfaces where they mesh and this gives a picture of the tooth contact pattern and its position. 16. Measure the backlash by using a rocker arm indicator, see Fig. 7. The backlash should be 0.10–0.20 mm (0.0039–0.0079"). 17. Remove the gear assembly and compare the contact pattern on the teeth with the pattern shown in Fig. 8 which is an ideal pattern. NOTE: The contact pattern is practically rectangular and, on the driving side it should be on the centre of the teeth, vertically but rather more towards the toe than the heel. If the input gear is moved from the outside inwards, the contact pattern moves from a low position to a high position on the gear. If the contact pattern is too high on the gear teeth, the input gear should be moved outwards and if it is too low, the input gear should be moved inwards. 18. When the correct tooth contact and backlash have been obtained for the “forward” gear, adjust the “reverse” gear in a corresponding way. Note here that only the shims under the reverse gear must be moved since otherwise it will alter the number of shims required under the “forward” Fig. 8gear. Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Dismantling the universal joint 5. Measure the shoulder on the double bearing box by using a micrometer, see measurement “A”, Fig. 5. 1. Remove the snap rings (72) which retain the needle bear- NOTE: The previously measured thickness of shims (16) ings in the yokes. between the bearing box and the gear housing should be 2. Use a hammer and drift to drive out the needle bearings, included here. see Fig. 9. Remove the spider. Inspecting the universal joint Examine the spider and needle bearings for play and possible wear marks in the bearing races. If faulty, the spider and needle bearings should be replaced as a complete unit. Also make sure that the needle bearing caps have play in the yokes, the yokes must also be replaced. Fig. 9. Assembling the universal joint 1. Install new seal washers on the spider. Feed the spider in the yoke. 2. Push the spider in one direction to allow the needle bearing to align with the spider. Then press in the needle bearing far enough to allow the snap ring to be installed. 3. Fit the oremaining needle bearing and snap ring in the same manner. C. Fitting Before fitting, wipe off the marking colour from all the gears. 1. Fit the “forward” gear together with the measured shims. 2. Fit the shaft (30), the snap ring (32), the washer (34), the spring (13) and the engaging sleeve (31). NOTE: The engaging sleeve must be turned so that the taper with the slot is located downwards, see Fig. 10. Place the shaft in the lower gear. 3. Place the upper gear together with its shims in the gear housing. Fit the bearings (28) with the spacer ring (29) between the bearings and the lower shaft circlips (35 and 36). 4. Tighten the nut (37) on the top of the countershaft to a tightening torque of 6 kgm (45 lb. ft.) NOTE: The nut has a left-hand thread. Use tool 884264 as a counterhold. Fig. 10 6. Then measure up the corresponding recess in the clamp ring (5). Use a depth gauge micrometer when measuring. 7. Fit so many shims between the clamp ring and the bearing box that the measurement ”A” together with the shims (16) exceeds the depth measurement in the clamp ring by 0.03–0.05 mm (0.0012–0.0020"). 8. Example: The measurement “A” is found to be 9.83 mm (0.387") and the shoulder in the clamp is 10.08 mm (0.397"). The difference is 10.08 – 9.83 = 0.25 mm (0.397 – 0.387 = 0.010"). To this is then added 0.03 – 0.05 mm (0.0012– 0.0020"). In this case the shim thickness will be 0.25+0.05 = 0.30 mm (0.010 + 0.0020 = 0.0120"). With this thickness of shims, the clearance between the clamp ring and the gear housing will be the smallest possible but the pressure on the double bearing box will be sufficiently large. 9. Remove tool 884286 from the double bearing box. Remove the spacer washer (17) and the shims, and fit against the roller bearing, the spacer ring (20), the seal ring (19) and the circlip (27). NOTE: The opening of the spacer ring should face downwards so that it coincides with the oilway in the double bearing box. Fit the spacer washer with shims. 10. Fit the O-ring (18) on the spacer washer (17). 11. Fit the shims and the two O-rings (15) on the double bearing box. 12. Place the clamp ring (5) and the double bearing box on the universal joint. Fit the screw (24) and the washer (23). Use VP part. no. 1161053-2 or corresponding locking liquid. Tighten the screw to a torque of 12.5 kgm (90 lb. ft.). 13. To protect the surfaces against corrosion, the surfaces between the clamp ring and the gear housing should be smeared with sealing compound VP part. no. 1141570-0 before assembling. 14. Fit the double bearing box with the universal joint in the gear housing. The guide pin in the double bearing box should face downwards. The screws should be coated with VP part. no. 1161053-2 or similar and tightened to a torque of 3.5 kgm (25 lb. ft.). Fitting the cover on the upper gear housing 1. Determine the measurement “B” in the cover (2), see Fig. 11. 2. Measure the distance from the outer bearing race to the plane of the gear housing, measurement “A”, Fig. 12, and fit shims so that the measurement exceeds “B” by 0.03–0.05 mm (0.0012–0.0020"). 3. Apply sealing compound and place the seal ring (41) so that the seal for the front, right screw fits into the recess in the cover provided for this purpose. Then fit in measured shims and tighten the cover. NOTE: The front, right screw is a tubular screw and should have a washer under its head. The tightening torque for the tubular screw is 1.5–1.8 kgm (11–13 lb. ft). Fig. 11 D. Reconditioning the control mechanism Removing 1. Knock out the load pin (57), see Fig. 13, and pull out the pin (56). Remove the locking wire (50), the spring (53), the ball (58) and pull out the eccentric piston (48). Remove the seal ring (59). 2. Clean the parts, check for wear and replace with new parts if necessary. Fig. 13 Assembly 1. Fit the seal ring in the cover, turn the side with the spring inwards. 2. Fit in the eccentric piston. Fit the pin (56) and secure the pin with the load pin (57). Make sure that the load pin is centrally located in the eccentric piston. 3. Fit the ball and the spring. Insert a locking wire in the slot in the cover and use this to compress the spring. Cut off the wire and bend down the end in the cover recess. The locking wire only function is to hold the spring while the control mechanism is fitted in the gear housing. 4. Fit the spring and shift shoe (55) as well as the O-ring (61). Coat the contact surfaces with VP part. no. 1141570-0. Tighten the control mechanism in the gear housing. 5. Move the control mechanism to its neutral position and remove all the shims (54) under the screw (51). It is now impossible to rotate the shaft (30). Then add shims one at a time until the shaft can be turned round. After adjusting, smear the shims and bolt with Fig. 12 sealing compound and then complete the final fitting. Part IV Reconditioning the intermediate housing A. Removing 1. Loosen the two screws (134) that retain the hose attachment (133) to the yoke. Remove the hose attachment and the packing. 2. Remove the yoke by knocking out the guide spindles (119 and 121). Use tool 884169 as a puller. See Fig. 14. 3. Loosen the screws (106) and the springs (108) for the retaining pawl. 4. Remove the two seal rings (123) and the needle bearing (122) with tools 884259 and 9991801, see Fig. 15. 5. Remove the shaft (110) for the shift yoke (109) and pull out the yoke. 6. Pull out the bearing race (159) for the shaft bearing. Use tools 884140 and 884143, see Fig. 16. 7. Clean the parts, check for wear and replace with new parts if necessary. Fig. 14 Fig. 15 B. Fitting 1. Grease the needle bearing (122) with Universal Grease and drive it into the yoke by using tools 884259 and 9991801. Press in the two seal rings (123) with same tools. NOTE: The seal rings are to seal against water and thus must be installed "facing" from each other, see Fig. 17. 2. Fit the yoke on the intermediate housing. NOTE: The wear washer should lie between the lower part of the yoke and the housing. The plastic bushings’ surfaces, facing the yoke, and the yoke hole should be coated with VP part. no. 1141570-0 as a protection against corrosion before fitting. The bushing flange should face the housing. NOTE: Care should be taken when fitting the lower guide spindle so that the lower seal ring is not damaged. 3. Fit the hose attachment and packing on the yoke. Coat the surfaces with VP part. no. 1161053-2. 4. Fit the retaining pawl with the push rod (118) and springs (108) on the yoke. 5. Fit the retaining mechanism rod and yoke and then fit the shaft (110) and secure with a cotter pin. NOTE: A washer should be fitted on each side of the cotter pin. Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Part V Reconditioning the lower gear A. Disassembly 1. Remove the two screws (182) retaining the propeller bearing housing (151). 2. Remove the propeller shaft (157) and the propeller bearing housing with tool 884161, see Fig. 18. If no such tool is available, then removal can be carried out by holding the propeller shaft and striking on the gear housing with a rubber mallet until the propeller shaft and the propeller bearing housing loosens from the gear housing. 3. Turn the lower gear housing upside down in tool 884264. Bend up the lock washer (164) on the nut (163), which retains the gear on the vertical drive shaft and unscrew nut. 4. Fold down the lock washer (161) and unscrew the round nut (162). Remove the lock washer and spacer ring (160). 5. Loosen the gear with tools 884267 and 884264, see Fig. 19. 6. Press off the ball and roller bearings from the vertical drive shaft in the press (884163) with tools 884265 and 884263, see Fig. 20. 7. Loosen the washer (176) from the propeller bearing housing and knock the propeller shaft out of the bearing housing. 8. Fold down the lock washer (168) and unscrew the round nut (169) on the propeller shaft. 9. Press the gear (172) and the bearing (167) off the propeller shaft simultaneously. 10. Remove the circlip (174) and the pump impeller (175) from the gear. NOTE: To avoid damaging the pump impeller during disassembling, exert pressure close to the two drive pins. 11. Knock out the two seal rings (183) in the propeller bearing housing. 12. If the needle bearing (165) for the vertical drive shaft (154) is damaged, it should be removed with tools 884143 and 884281. Place tool 884281 in the outer race from underneath the needle bearing after the needles and needle container have been removed by deformation. Then press drift 884143 downwards. When the expander has been pressed apart by the drift, knock out the bearing race. 13. If the needle bearing (158) for the propeller shaft is damaged, remove it with tools 884169 and 884298. Place puller 884298 in the needle bearing with the hooks on the rear side of the bearing. Screw in extractor 884169 so that the hooks are tensioned apart and the bearing can be removed. Thereafter remove the bearing race off the needle bearing on the propeller shaft. 14. Check all the components for wear and replace any if necessary. NOTE: The gears are sold in pairs to ensure the correct tooth pattern. Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 B. Fitting 1. Grease both seal rings (183) and fit them in the propeller bearing housing with tool 884283. NOTE: The seal rings should be turned so that they seal against water and also against oil in the gear housing. See Fig. 21. 2. Press on the bearing race for the propeller shaft needle bearings (158). 3. Fit the pump impeller (175) and the circlip (174) on the gear (172). 4. Fit the gear pump and the washer (176) on the propeller shaft and press on the bearing (167). Use tool 884263. The bearing is fitted so that the recess in the bearing races for the assembly of balls are turned to face the gear. Fit the lock washer (168) and the nut (169). Secure the nut with the lock washer. 5. Place an 0.2 mm (0.008") shim (191) in the propeller bearing housing and then fit the propeller shaft with the bearing in the house. Be careful when fitting to ensure that the bearing is correctly located in the bearing housing. 6. Tighten the washer (176). 7. Pull in the needle bearing (165) for the vertical drive shaft (154). Use tool 884241. See Fig. 22. NOTE: The side of the bearing where the bearing designation is stamped must face downwards. 8. Fit the needle bearing (158) for the propeller shaft. The side of the bearing where the designation is stamped should face astern. Use tools 884283 and 9991801. 9. Press the ball bearing (155) on the vertical drive shaft with the help of tool 884266. Hold the bearing in position by means of a spacer sleeve and the round nut (162) so that the bearing does not move during assembly. 10. Place an 0.3 mm (0.012") shim (156) in the gear housing and fit the drive shaft together with the gear (172), the lock washer (164) and the nut (163). To guide the shaft during assembly, first locate the gear in position. 11. Tighten the nut (163) to a tightening torque of 14 kgm (100 lb. ft.). Use tool 884264 in the splined end as a counterhold. See Fig. 23. Adjusting the lower gear 1. Apply marking dye to the gears. 2. Fit the gear assembly into the gear housing. 3. Place tool 884264 on the splined end and rotate the gears in their correct direction of rotation at the same time as they are braked hard with the propeller shaft. 4. Check the backlash which is measured directly on the vertical drive shaft splines. The backlash here should be 0.04–0.08 mm (0.0016–0.0031") which gives a backlash of 0.10–0.20 mm (0.0039–0.0079") on the gears. See Fig. 24. Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 5. Loosen the screws and pull out the propeller shaft. 6. Check that the contact pattern on the tooth surfaces corresponds with that shown in Fig. 25. If the contact pattern is not correct, move the shims (156) and (191) as follows: If the pattern is too high on the gear tooth, move the gear upwards and if it is too low, move the gear downwards. 7. When the correct tooth contact and backlash have been obtained, tighten the nut (163) to a torque of 14 kgm (100 lb. ft.) and then secure the drive shaft with the lock washer (164). 8. Locate the O-rings (179) on the bearing housing and fit the gear assembly in the gear housing and tighten them with the two internal hexagon screws. Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fitting the axial bearing Determine the thickness of the shims (190), which are to be located between the ball bearing (155) and the axial bearing (159) as follows: 1. Measure the distance from the inner ring of the ball bearing to the surface of the gear housing, dimension “A” in Fig. 26. 2. Measure the width of the axial bearing by placing a number of shims (156) on a flat disc and then locating the bearing as shown in Fig. 27. The total dimension of the shims is then subtracted from the dimension obtained during the measuring. NOTE: If no shims are placed under the outer bearing race, no measurement can be made as this will result in the roller retainer lying against the flat disc so that the measuring will be faulty. Then deduct the dimension “A” from the value obtained above. Fig. 26 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. Since the axial bearing is to project 7.95 mm (0.312" above the gear housing and there is to be a clearance of 0.05 mm (0.002") between the intermediate housing and the gear housing, the value obtained under point 2. must be subtracted from 8.00 mm (0.315"). The value thus obtained is the thickness of the shims to be fitted between the bearings. Example: dimension ”A” is measured to 12.37 mm (0.8470") and the bearing width to 18.25 mm (0.7185"). Thus 18.25 – 12.37 = 5.88 mm (0.7185 – 0.4870 = 0.2315"). The bearing + the clearance is to project 8.00 mm (0.315") above the housing, i. e. 8.00 – 5.88 = 2.12 (0.315 – 0.2315 = 0.0835"). In this case shims with a thickness of 2.10 mm (0.0827") are fitted under the axial bearing. Fit the measured shims (190), the bearing (159), the spacer ring (160), the lock washer (161) and the nut (162). Tighten the nut and secure it with the lock washer. Press the axial bearing outer race into the intermediate housing. Fit the oil drain plug in the gear housing. NOTE: Do not forget the washer. Fit a new zinc ring. Make sure that there is good metallic contact between the zinc ring and the propeller bearing housing. PartVI Assembling the outboard drive unit Fig. 27 Fit the lower gear housing on the intermediate housing. Use three new O-rings (87, 124, 192) and apply VP sealing compound 1141570-0 to the contact surfaces. Tighten the bolts all round, in diagonally opposite sequence. Measure the distance on the upper gear housing from the outer bearing race on the lower bearing (11) to the gear housing surface. 3. Determine the depth of the corresponding recess for the bearing race in the intermediate housing and add to the measurement under point 2, the thickness of shims (88) so that the depth measurement in the intermediate housing is exceeded by 0.03–0.05 mm (0.0012–0.0020"). 4. Fit the splined sleeve (193) on the vertical drive shaft and the two O-rings (86, 87) and the shims on the intermediate housing. Apply VP sealing compound 1141570 to the contact surfaces. Fit the upper gear housing on the intermediate housing. Tighten the bolts all round, in diagonally opposite sequence. PartVII Installing the drive to the transom shield Fit the rubber bellows (45, 62) for the exhaust outlet, the universal joint and the cooling water hose (146) on the connections in the shield. NOTE: The cooling water hose is marked with “Engine” on the end to be fitted on the shield. Lift the outboard drive over to the shield and block it up under the fin so that it comes up to the right height. Hang the hose clip (64) for the universal joint rubber bellows on the gear housing neck. Grease the universal joint and shaft splines. Move the gear towards the drive shaft at the same time as the universal joint is turned so that the splines on the drive shaft can engage with the splines on the universal joint. NOTE: Be careful when fitting so that there is no burr on the splines to make assembly difficult. 4. Move the outboard drive mounting yoke (91) into the shield and line it up so that the pins (20) can be pushed into the holes in the yoke. The pins should be coated with Molykote or similar in order to prevent the pins from corroding in the holes. NOTE: Do not forget to fit the two wear washers (141) between the yoke and the mounting lugs on the transom shield. Turn the pins so that the locking bolts can be fitted. Tighten the locking bolts. 5. Fit the rubber bellows on the universal joint. Locate the clip so that the tightening screw ends up on the underside of the bellows. Make sure that the bellows are correctly fitted and that both clips are tightened to prevent leakage. 6. Hang on the hose clips (46, 147) for the exhaust and cooling water hoses. Connect the hoses and tighten the clips with the tightening screws located on the side of the hose. Excluding the exhaust hose, the hose clips should be turned as shown in Figs. 28 and 29. It is extremely important that the clips are fitted correctly, otherwise they can damage adjacent hoses as well as hinder the movements of the drive. 7. Push out the control cable through the transom shield and fit it into the outboard drive. Fit the locking plate (138) so that it locks in the cable groove. 8. Check that the control lever and the drive shift lever are in their neutral position. Screw on the lock nut and the securing block on the control cable so far that the securing block can be fitted in the lever. The bearings of the shift rod 9, Fig. 30 and the control cable 6, Fig. 30 must not jam in the levers in the “Forward”, ”Reverse” and “Neutral” positions. 9. The lever must be so adjusted that it does not catch in the housing when in “Forward” gear. Adjustments can be made at the securing block 10 and at the upper end 8 of the shift rod. 10. The function of the push rod 3 is to release the retaining pawl 5 when the drive tips up. The push rod can be checked and adjusted in the following way: a) Pull the drive backwards so that the retaining pawl engages securely in the setting pin 4. b) Check that the adjusting sleeve (2) on the upper part of the push rod projects 3.5–4 mm (0.138–0.157") (“A” measurement) above the lift lever. c) Press down the adjusting sleeve level with the lift lever and check that the drive can release from the setting pin. d) If necessary, turn the adjusting sleeve so that sufficient impact is obtained. Secure the sleeve with VP locking liquid p/n 1161053-2 in such cases when no other securing device is fitted. 11. Fit the protective cover 7 over the control mechanism. 12. Fill the outboard drive with oil. It has a capacity of about 2 litres (2 US quarts), see Part IX, “Specifications”. Grease the steering rod lower bearing in the yoke. Fitting the propeller Fit the spacer sleeve (184) on the propeller shaft. Coat the propeller shaft with VP water-resistant grease p/n 828250-1 and slide on the propeller. Fit the lock washer (186) and the propeller cone (185). Secure the cone with the lock washer. Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 PartVIII Reconditioning the lift 1. Remove the protective cover and take off the switch (32, Fig. 32) as well as the bracket with the relays (40 or 44). 2. Slacken the nuts (22) and remove the electric motor (20). 3. Fold down the lock washer (10A) and screw off the limiting screw (10) and the sealing nut (9). 4. Screw off the upper section (2) and lift out the worm rod (5), the spring (11), the bearings (16) and the worm gear (7). 5. Pull out the guide ring (14) and the worm (8) with the bearing (17). 6. Clean the parts and check for wear. Replace any parts if necessary. 7. Fit the lift in the reverse order to removal. Before fitting, grease the parts with universal grease and fill the upper part of the housing with grease. Check after reconditioning After reconditioning, check that the drive tip-up and retaining pawl mechanism function satisfactorily. During tilting, the lift should clear the retaining pawl completely from the setting pin before the drive tilts up. The length of the push rod is adjusted according to point 10, Part VII. When the outboard drive is lowered, the lift motor should be run until it automatically stops and the warning light goes out. Wiring diagram for lift Component 1. Key switch 2. Switch 3. Relay 4. Electric motor 6. Motor cut-out 7. Circuit breaker 8. Warning lamp Cable markings Des. Colour mm2 A' Ivory 2,5 A'' Ivory 1,5 B Black 1,5 C' Red (+) 2,5 C'' Red (+) 1,5 D* Green 2,5 D Green 1,5 Fig. 31H Blue 2,5 Fig. 32 Part IX Specifications General description, Aquamatic 200 Type designation .............................................................................. Aquamatic 200 B, Part No. 814050 Aquamatic 200 C, Part No. 814200 Shift mechanism .............................................................................. “Silent-Shift”, self-adjusting cone clutch with servo-disengagement. Adjustable for double installation. Maximum propeller diameter ............................................................ 15" Tip-up angle, approx ........................................................................ 65° Lift unit, type..................................................................................... Electro-mechanical Steering angle, maximum ................................................................. 30° Overall reduction ratio Type 200 B ....................................................................................... 1.59:1 Type 200 C ....................................................................................... 1.85:1 (1.85:1, marked under the zinc ring) Lubricating system Pump, type ...................................................................................... Circulation pump. Supplying oil to all the lubricating points. Oil recommendations for outboard drive Make Grade Lubriplate Marine 90 BP EP 90 Caltex Universal Thuban 90 Castrol OB or Hypoy 90 Esso Gear oil GP 80-90 Gulf Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricant SAE 90 Mobiloil Mobilube GX 80-90 Shell Spirax 90 EP Never use oil with higher viscosity than SAE 90. Fig. 33 Backlash Upper gear, measured directly on the gear wheels ............................. 0.10–0.20 mm (0.0039–0.0079") Lower gear, measured on the drive shaft splines ................................ 0.04–0.08 = 0.10–0.20 mm (0.0016–0.0032 = 0.0039– 0.0079"). Adjustment for change from L. H. to R. H. propeller The gears in the upper gear housing are designed so that they can be used either with a left-hand or a right-hand propeller. For standard rotation, that is using a left-hand propeller, the lower gear functions as the forward drive gear, and when a right-hand propeller is used, the upper gear becomes the forward drive gear. Location of Standard gear control rod location fo gear To obtain rotation in the opposite direction, the control rod for use with control rod for between the yoke (109) and the lever (48) on the gear right-hand use with left- mechanism should be moved as follows: propeller hand propeller 1. Remove the cover (84) from the gear mechanism. 2. Move the gear control rod (111) from “A” to “B” as shown in Fig. 34. For both a left- and right-hand propeller, the control cable has a “push” motion for engaging the forward gear. Check and adjust Fig. 34the gear control according to Part VII, points 8–11. Part X Special tools 884140 884143 884165 884241 884258 884259 884263 884264 884265 884266 884267 884281 884283 884285 9991801 884169 884246 884286 884298 Fig. 35 Pos. Part No. Description 1 584140 Expander for removing bearing race of axial bear10 884264 Sleeve for countershaft. ing in intermediate housing. 11 884265 Sleeve for removing gear wheel and bearing on 2 884143 Drift for tools 884281 and 884140. propeller shaft. 3 884165 Tool for removing bearings on drive in upper gear 12 884266 Drift for fitting bearing on vertical drive shaft. housing. 13 884267 Tool for removing vertical drive shaft. 4 884169 Puller for guide spindles in the yoke. 14 884281 Expander for removing vertical drive shaft needle 5 884241 Tool for fitting needle bearings of vertical drive bearings. shaft. 15 884283 Drift for removing sealing rings in propeller shaft 6 884246 Drift for fitting seal ring in double bearing box. bearing housing and fitting needle bearings for 7 884258 Sleeve for removing and fitting gear wheel in up-propeller shaft. per gear. 16 884285 Attaching plate for upper gear housing. 8 884259 Drift for removing gear wheel in upper gear and 17 884286 Tensioner bolt for fitting double bearing box. removing and fitting bearing and sealing rings in the yoke. 18 9991801 Standard handle for drifts. 9 884263 Drift for fitting bearing on propeller shaft and input drive in upper gear. 19 884298 Puller for propeller shaft needle bearings (only the yoke). Part XI Assembly drawings Fig. 36. Flywheel housing and transom shield. Fig. 37. Intermediate housing. Fig. 38. Upper gear housing Fig. 39. Lower gear housing Notes Report form Do you have any complaints or other comments about this manual? Please make a copy of this page, write your comments down and post it to us. The address is at the bottom of the page. We would prefer you to write in English or Swedish. From: ............................................................................ ...................................................................................... ...................................................................................... ...................................................................................... Refers to publication:............................................................................................................................................ 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Date: ........................................................... Name: ......................................................... AB Volvo Penta Customer Support Dept. 42200 SE-405 08 Gothenburg Sweden .. ..c ;c wcO .'_ 0 ;c000